Chemistry and Biochemistry

Chemistry Department News

Viewing posts for the category Faculty

Jerald Bradshaw, Students Recognized at Chemistry Awards Banquet

Posted: in Faculty, Student, Apr 08, 2013

Department administrators decided to change up the April 3 Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Awards Banquet a bit this year by including the presentation of its annual Department Pillar Award.

Dr. Jerald S. Bradshaw was awarded the honor, which recognizes emeritus professors who have made a significant impact on the department. Organic chemistry professor Dr. Paul B. Savage, who was part of Dr. Bradshaw’s lab when he was an undergraduate, spoke of the many ...

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A Chemist Without Borders

Posted: in Faculty, Mar 07, 2013

Though it was her husband’s political science research that brought her to Uganda, chemistry professor Jennifer Nielson started a project of her own. She began with a simple question—What’s happening with science in Uganda? What she found surprised her.

“The conditions teachers had to work in were pretty abysmal,” said Nielson. “I couldn’t believe how little resources there were, even at the university.”

In many schools, they didn’t even have ...

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CPMS Recognizes Dr. Macedone for Excellent Teaching

Posted: in Faculty, Staff, Feb 07, 2013

Dr. Jeff H. Macedone recently received the Faculty Excellence in Teaching Award (3-10 years) at the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences Awards Banquet on Thursday, January 31.

“[Dr.] Macedone is an energetic teacher whose enthusiasm is contagious,” a news article in the college newsletter reads. “Though his courses can be tough, students continue to give him the highest ratings.”

Appropriately, Dr. Macedone’s favorite part about his job is turning students on to chemistry ...

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A Chemical Breakthrough

Posted: in Faculty, Organic, Research, Jan 10, 2013

Dr. Daniel Ess’s new chemical reaction has caused a national reaction among chemists.

Pharmaceutical companies don’t like to use metal catalysts to synthesize their drugs. So when Dr. Ess and a collaboration of professors discovered a way to do a needed reaction without metal, it gained national attention.

“The problem is even if you put a little bit of metal in your reaction, you’re going to spend enormous effort and time cleaning ...

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Milton Lee Honored in Chromatography Journal Special Issue

Posted: in Analytical, Faculty, Research, Nov 16, 2012

On October 26, the Journal of Chromatography A published a special issue in honor of Dr Milton L Lee, a distinguished and respected researcher in the scientific community and at Brigham Young University.

The issue was organized by Lee’s former students and colleagues, and each article included in the issue was written or co-written by someone who worked with and was influenced by Lee. The foreword, written by Doug Raynie, a former graduate student ...

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Daniel Ess' Research Highlighted in C&E News

Posted: in Faculty, Organic, Research, Nov 14, 2012

The Chemical & Engineering News (C&E News) recently highlighted a paper by collaborators Dr Daniel Ess of BYU and Dr László Kürti of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The research details the experiment and theory of a new organic reagent that converts aryl boronic acids to primary aromatic amines.

The article was published Oct. 22 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS). C&E News referenced it in their Nov. 5 ...

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Rare Sponges May Carry a New Cure for Cancer

Posted: in Faculty, Organic, Research, Oct 30, 2012

Cancer-killing chemicals in sea sponges? Sounds too good to be true.

But it’s not. Two years ago, Japanese scientists found a chemical compound inside of deep-sea sponges that helps destroy certain cancer cells.

The compound yaku’amide A is likely produced by bacteria that only grow in a certain type of deep-sea sponge. But it grows in such low quantities that it’s rather impractical to try to harvest. The more practical solution is ...

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Measuring Molecules With the Naked Eye

Posted: in Analytical, Faculty, Research, Student, Oct 25, 2012

When someone develops liver cancer, the disease introduces a very subtle difference to their bloodstream, increasing the concentration of a particular molecule by just 10 parts per billion.

That small shift is difficult to detect without sophisticated lab equipment – but perhaps not for long. A new “lab on a chip” designed by Brigham Young University professor Adam Woolley and his students reveals the presence of ultra-low concentrations of a target molecule.

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