Chemistry and Biochemistry

Chemistry Department News

Viewing posts for the category Research

Migraine Research Development Attracts National Attention

Posted: in Research, May 03, 2013

A new development in Dr. Emily Bates’ migraine research may change the future of migraine medicine and has attracted the attention of national news.

National Public Radio interviewed Dr. Bates for a news slot in its award-winning show, “All Things Considered,” which aired Wednesday, May 1. Local television news stations includingKUTV Channel TwoFox 13 and ABC4 also covered the story.

With a team of researchers from around the country, Dr. Bates recently determined ...

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Starving Cancer

Posted: in Biochemistry, Faculty, Research, Apr 19, 2013

What if we could starve cancer? Dr. Josh Andersen aims to do just that, with his team of eight students and a slew of tumors in petri dishes.

“If we can prevent tumors from using energy, we can basically starve them and the tumors die,” Andersen said.

All cells have a metabolism that uses energy, typically in the form of glucose. But tumors use this energy in a fairly unique way. Andersen’s team hopes ...

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Former Graduate Student of Daniel Austin Receives NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Posted: in Research, Student, Apr 17, 2013

Terik Daly, a former BYU student in the Department of Geological Sciences, recently received a highly competitive NSF (National Science Foundation) Graduate Research Fellowship as well as the Geological Society of America’s Stephen E. Dwornik Award. Both of these significant awards came as a result of Daly’s research on something very small—dust. Cosmic dust, that is.

Read the full article here.

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BYU Scientists Find Gene Sequences That Stall Protein Synthesis

Posted: in Research, Mar 01, 2013

Machines don't always run smoothly--phone calls drop, computers crash and cars stall

A new Brigham Young University study shows the same kinds of problems happen to the molecular machinery within our cells.

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A Chemical Breakthrough

Posted: in Faculty, Organic, Research, Jan 10, 2013

Dr. Daniel Ess’s new chemical reaction has caused a national reaction among chemists.

Pharmaceutical companies don’t like to use metal catalysts to synthesize their drugs. So when Dr. Ess and a collaboration of professors discovered a way to do a needed reaction without metal, it gained national attention.

“The problem is even if you put a little bit of metal in your reaction, you’re going to spend enormous effort and time cleaning ...

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Milton Lee Honored in Chromatography Journal Special Issue

Posted: in Analytical, Faculty, Research, Nov 16, 2012

On October 26, the Journal of Chromatography A published a special issue in honor of Dr Milton L Lee, a distinguished and respected researcher in the scientific community and at Brigham Young University.

The issue was organized by Lee’s former students and colleagues, and each article included in the issue was written or co-written by someone who worked with and was influenced by Lee. The foreword, written by Doug Raynie, a former graduate student ...

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Daniel Ess' Research Highlighted in C&E News

Posted: in Faculty, Organic, Research, Nov 14, 2012

The Chemical & Engineering News (C&E News) recently highlighted a paper by collaborators Dr Daniel Ess of BYU and Dr László Kürti of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The research details the experiment and theory of a new organic reagent that converts aryl boronic acids to primary aromatic amines.

The article was published Oct. 22 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS). C&E News referenced it in their Nov. 5 ...

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Rare Sponges May Carry a New Cure for Cancer

Posted: in Faculty, Organic, Research, Oct 30, 2012

Cancer-killing chemicals in sea sponges? Sounds too good to be true.

But it’s not. Two years ago, Japanese scientists found a chemical compound inside of deep-sea sponges that helps destroy certain cancer cells.

The compound yaku’amide A is likely produced by bacteria that only grow in a certain type of deep-sea sponge. But it grows in such low quantities that it’s rather impractical to try to harvest. The more practical solution is ...

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