Chemistry and Biochemistry

Dr. Adam Woolley Receives Reed M. Izatt and James J. Christensen Faculty Excellence in Research Award

Posted: in Analytical, Faculty, Sep 14, 2012

Professor Adam T. Woolley received the 2012 Reed M. Izatt and James J. Christensen Faculty Excellence in Research Award Thursday, September 13. He also presented a lecture on his research in developing novel systems for application in chemical analysis and materials chemistry.

He and his research group use their knowledge of molecular interactions to make innovations and help streamline existing procedures such as quantifying biomarkers (which “have great potential for use in diagnosing diseases, determining the effectiveness of treatments, and detecting recurrence”), analyzing samples (“Simplified analysis systems that offer the performance of benchtop instruments but the convenience of portability are highly desirable”) and engineering nanoscale structures through DNA origami.

Dr. Woolley addressed three current areas of interest in the seminar: integrated immunoaffinity and solid-phase extraction microfluidic devices for biomarker quantitation, “flow valve” microfluidic systems for simple measurement of sample concentrations, and DNA-templated formation of designed hybrid organic/inorganic nanostructures.

“These studies demonstrate the exceptional versatility of using molecular interactions to enable various chemical methods,” Dr. Woolley concluded in his abstract. “We have utilized these capabilities in enhancing the synthesis of nanoscale materials with controlled dimensions and compositions, simplifying biochemical quantitation systems, and providing automated biomolecular analysis. These broad applications highlight the considerable future promise of leveraging molecular interactions in the chemical sciences.”

Dr. Reed M. Izatt was on hand Thursday when Dr. Woolley was presented with the Reed M. Izatt and James J. Christensen Faculty Excellence in Research Award before Dr. Woolley delivered his lecture to a crowd of chemists, biochemists and chemical engineers (including students and faculty).

By Jessica Henrie

Photos by Rachael Roselle